Mental Health @ Home book review: You Don't Look Sick
MH@H Book Reviews

Book Review: You Don’t Look Sick

You Don't Look Sick: My Journey With an Invisible Illness by Kristen Dutkiewicz is a memoir recounting her experiences with multiple sclerosis. The book is written in a way that's likely to be useful for people who have MS, people wanting to support someone in their life with MS, and people who are curious to… Continue reading Book Review: You Don’t Look Sick

Mental health bullet journalling - image of a journal
Mental Health & Illness

Bullet Journalling Part II: Tracking

Living with a chronic health condition, it can be hard to see patterns in all the different things that are going on. That's especially true if brain fog gets in the way of being able to remember things. That's where tracking in a bullet journal (or in an app, or elsewhere) can come in handy.… Continue reading Bullet Journalling Part II: Tracking

What is... Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) - cartoon of exhausted snail
Insights into Psychology Series

What Is… ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue)

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms... but not this week. Instead, we'll take a look at ME/CFS, and why it's absolutely not all in someone's head. The National Institutes of Health describes ME/CFS as "a debilitating disease that lacks a universally accepted case definition, cause, diagnosis, or… Continue reading What Is… ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue)

The emerging blogger series on Mental Health @ Home
Community Features

Mental Health and COVID Restriction Easing (Guest Post)

This post on mental health effects of COVID reopening comes from Escaping the Cage. Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay  Mental Health and COVID Restriction Easing I’m worried about my mental health as COVID restrictions are eased. I know that for many people COVID has brought many challenges to their mental as well as physical health. For me, however,… Continue reading Mental Health and COVID Restriction Easing (Guest Post)

The mental illness cutlery drawer: spoon theory, fork theory, knives, and more
Mental Health & Illness

The Mental Illness Cutlery Drawer: Spoons, Forks & More

You may have heard of spoon theory, a popular metaphor for dealing with chronic illness and energy-depleting activities. You're probably less likely to have heard of a variant called fork theory, and you probably haven't heard of knife theory. In this post, we're going to do a deep dive into the mental illness cutlery drawer,… Continue reading The Mental Illness Cutlery Drawer: Spoons, Forks & More

Sometimes okay means not okay - happy and sad faces
Mental Health & Illness

When “Okay” Means Not Okay

I suspect that many of us living with mental illness, or any other chronic illness, for that matter, have a standard set of responses that we sometimes draw on when answering questions about how we are and what we do. "Not okay" just isn't something most people want to hear. For me, these standard responses… Continue reading When “Okay” Means Not Okay

It gets better... or does it? With chronic mental illness, you can't be sure
Mental Health & Illness

It Gets Better… Or Does It? – Dealing with Chronic Mental Illness

On a fairly regular basis, I see messaging along the lines of "it gets better," or some variation thereof. While the intention behind it is good, I'm not convinced that it's useful, because it's not necessarily true. There's a U.S.-based non-profit organization called It Gets Better that provides support to LGBTQ+ youth who are being bullied.… Continue reading It Gets Better… Or Does It? – Dealing with Chronic Mental Illness

Community Features

Emerging Blogger Series: Mio (Mentally Ill in America)

This post is by Mio of Mentally Ill in America. My Possible Origin Story It most likely began when I was two. I was taken to the ER for a fever that would ultimately rise to 107. But, first there was church to attend to… Once that let out (or whenever it was that my… Continue reading Emerging Blogger Series: Mio (Mentally Ill in America)

diagram of the gate control theory of pain
Science Corner

Gate Control Theory of Pain

What does the gate control theory of pain have to do with a mental health blog? Well, co-occurring mental illness and chronic pain are remarkably common. For example, among people with fibromyalgia, over 50% experience depression. The rates of anxiety disorders are also over 50%. People with depression and anxiety disorders are also at increased risk to… Continue reading Gate Control Theory of Pain

Mental illness life: comparing spoon theory and fork theory
Mental Health & Illness

Fork Theory: How the Anti-Spoons Affect Mental Illness

I first heard about fork theory from a post on the blog Bipolar Me. Well, that's not exactly true; I had noticed that some people had made their way to my post on spoon theory by searching for fork theory. Being a bit of a doofus, I had assumed that people were just getting their… Continue reading Fork Theory: How the Anti-Spoons Affect Mental Illness