Internet Acronyms, AKA proof that I'm old: TMI, LOL, OMG, YOLO
Miscellaneous

Internet Acronyms, aka Proof That I’m Old

This internet acronyms post is inspired by a comment that Cassandra made on a post I did about idioms. I'm in my 40s and Gen-X, so compared to the kids on the internet these days, I'm old. I also spend very little time on social media, so I'm pretty out of the loop. There are… Continue reading Internet Acronyms, aka Proof That I’m Old

Stigma, word policing, and targeting the wrong audience: graphic of tree with dialogue bubbles
Stop the Stigma

Stigma, Word Policing, and Targeting the Wrong Audience

Stigma is a social phenomenon that encompasses stereotypes, prejudiced attitudes based on those stereotypes, and discriminatory behaviours. There are a lot of anti-stigma advocates, both organizations and individuals, focusing on word usage and what to say or not say about mental illness. This is sometimes referred to as word policing or language policing. Sometimes, those… Continue reading Stigma, Word Policing, and Targeting the Wrong Audience

Lost in translation: Greek sign translated as "bathing of dogs prohibited"
Miscellaneous

Lost in Translation English Signs

If you're making a sign that includes languages on your own, you'll probably want some help to get it right. Sometimes Google Translate doesn't tell you the right thing. Sometimes, people get creative and decide to skip that step altogether, and just ask their neighbour whose cousin moved to the US, because presumably the neighbour… Continue reading Lost in Translation English Signs

Bumpin' uglies and other slang for "down there" business - image of a banana
Miscellaneous

Bumpin’ Uglies & Other Slang for What Goes On “Down There”

People had a good laugh with a recent post on idioms, so I thought why not have some more fun with silly language. This post explores some of the more colourful terms terms for what goes on when the pants come off. I'll try to leave out the mundane and stick with silly rather than… Continue reading Bumpin’ Uglies & Other Slang for What Goes On “Down There”

word aversion: Does "moist" gross you out?
Blogging and Writing

Word Aversion: What Words Gross You Out?

Grace at Just Tawkin' recently mentioned that moist is the most hated word in the English language and I felt the need to go exploring to learn more about gross words. It turns out word aversion is the fancy way of referring to words that are just plain icky—not what the words are describing, but… Continue reading Word Aversion: What Words Gross You Out?

Mental illness, person-first language, and stigma
Stop the Stigma

Is Person-First Language All It’s Cracked Up to Be?

Is there a "right" way to talk about illness and disability? The current popular favourite is person-first language. It really got going in the 1990s, with the American Psychological Association leading the charge. Instead of talking about a "disabled person", person-first language literally puts the person first, as in "person with a disability." This has… Continue reading Is Person-First Language All It’s Cracked Up to Be?

English can be strange - Can you be combobulated? What about gruntled?
Blogging and Writing

English Can Be a Rather Strange Language

English is a strange. Recently I was reading a post by Claudette of Writer of Words, and Angie of King Ben's Grandma had left a comment about how one might use the word combobulated, which presumably exists because you can say someone is discombobulated. I wondered something similar not long ago about disgruntled/gruntled, and apparently,… Continue reading English Can Be a Rather Strange Language

The use and misuse of jargon - diagram of science equipment
Science Corner

The Use and Misuse of Jargon

Many fields have their own jargon, which Wikipedia describes as "specialized terminology associated with a particular field or area of activity" that often isn't well understand by people outside of that particular field. While jargon can help people within a field communicate precisely, that doesn't necessarily translate well outside of the field. It can be… Continue reading The Use and Misuse of Jargon