Canadian flag superimposed on map of Canada
Miscellaneous

Do We Talk Funny? How We Speak in Canada vs. the US and UK

To round out the week of fluff posts, I have a non-list post for you. I read a lot of blogs written by Americans, Brits, and assorted other folks from around the world. We don't all write (or talk) the same way. These kinds of things interest me, do I thought I'd do a post… Continue reading Do We Talk Funny? How We Speak in Canada vs. the US and UK

How we talk about mental illness: definitions and connotations
Mental Health & Illness

How We Talk About Mental Illness: Definitions vs. Connotations

Some of the posts I’ve written lately, as well as people’s comments on response, have got me thinking about the different ways that different people may use the same words. When it comes to mental health conditions, there are technical medical/psychiatric/psychological definitions of terms, but those aren't necessarily the definitions that people are using in… Continue reading How We Talk About Mental Illness: Definitions vs. Connotations

Is it useful to talk around mental illness?
Stop the Stigma

Is It Helpful to Talk Around Mental Illness?

Mental illness can involve feeling really crappy and having a lot of difficulty functioning. That's not the experience of everyone with mental illness all of the time, but it's there in the mix somewhere. Yet sometimes it seems like people want to avoid the ugly bits, and talk around mental illness rather than talking about… Continue reading Is It Helpful to Talk Around Mental Illness?

Internet Acronyms, AKA proof that I'm old: TMI, LOL, OMG, YOLO
Miscellaneous

Internet Acronyms & Proof That I’m Old

This internet acronyms post is inspired by a comment that Cassandra made on a post I did about idioms. I'm in my 40s and Gen-X, so compared to the kids on the internet these days, I'm old. I also spend very little time on social media, so I'm pretty out of the loop. There are… Continue reading Internet Acronyms & Proof That I’m Old

Stigma, word policing, and targeting the wrong audience: graphic of tree with dialogue bubbles
Stop the Stigma

Stigma, Word Policing, and Targeting the Wrong Audience

Stigma is a social phenomenon that encompasses stereotypes, prejudiced attitudes based on those stereotypes, and discriminatory behaviours. There are a lot of anti-stigma advocates, both organizations and individuals, focusing on word usage and what to say or not say about mental illness. This is sometimes referred to as word policing or language policing. Sometimes, those… Continue reading Stigma, Word Policing, and Targeting the Wrong Audience

Bumpin' uglies and other slang for "down there" business - image of a banana
Miscellaneous

Bumpin’ Uglies & Other Slang for What Goes On “Down There”

People had a good laugh with a recent post on idioms, so I thought why not have some more fun with silly language. This post explores some of the more colourful terms terms for what goes on when the pants come off. I'll try to leave out the mundane and stick with silly rather than… Continue reading Bumpin’ Uglies & Other Slang for What Goes On “Down There”

word aversion: Does "moist" gross you out?
Blogging and Writing

Word Aversion: What Words Gross You Out?

Grace at Just Tawkin' recently mentioned that moist is the most hated word in the English language and I felt the need to go exploring to learn more about gross words. It turns out word aversion is the fancy way of referring to words that are just plain icky—not what the words are describing, but… Continue reading Word Aversion: What Words Gross You Out?

Mental illness, person-first language, and stigma
Stop the Stigma

Is Person-First Language All It’s Cracked Up to Be?

Is there a "right" way to talk about illness and disability? The current popular favourite is person-first language. It really got going in the 1990s, with the American Psychological Association leading the charge. Instead of talking about a "disabled person", person-first language literally puts the person first, as in "person with a disability." This has… Continue reading Is Person-First Language All It’s Cracked Up to Be?