many arrows pointing at the central intersection

Intersectionality and what it means for mental health

The concept of intersectionality was first proposed in 1989 by black feminist researcher Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw to represent the many different layers of social stratification that can combine to disadvantage people.  This includes factors like race, sexual orientation, social class, age, disability, and gender.  Expanding on this concept, sociologist Patricia Hill Collins described the intersectional points … Continue reading Intersectionality and what it means for mental health

Share this:
group protesting, with a no sign in foreground

NIMBYism and mental health housing

NIMBYism is a fascinating phenomenon.  NIMBYs, or people think that something is okay just as long as it's Not In My BackYard, cover discrimination with a thin veneer of civility and acceptability.  Among the many manifestations of this is with regards to social housing, including supported housing for people with mental illness. NIMBYs' arguments may … Continue reading NIMBYism and mental health housing

Share this:
drawing of a crowd of multicolored human shapes

Can the social and biological aspects of mental illness be separated?

While there is debate over the roles of biological susceptibility and psychosocial factors in triggering the onset of mental illness, it's also worth giving some thought to how the illness experience is shaped by social factors vs. biologically-based symptoms. Once we are ill, we experience symptoms that are influenced by neurophysiological processes, regardless of whether … Continue reading Can the social and biological aspects of mental illness be separated?

Share this:
dictionary

How picky should we be about suicide-related language?

Language matters when it comes to talking about suicide, particularly when it's mentioned in the media.  Sometimes, though, I wonder if getting too nitpicky about language is counterproductive.  After all, as stigma researcher Patrick Corrigan says, stigma gets attached to labels but is not a product of those labels. On Twitter I recently came across … Continue reading How picky should we be about suicide-related language?

Share this: