Separating sex and gender: What's biology, and what's socially constructed?
Society & Social Justice

Separating Out Sex/Gender, Biology and Social Construct

I got thinking about this after watching an interview with Steven Pinker, one of my academic crushes, and then another interview with Jordan Peterson. Both referred to biological differences between men and women, although in different ways, and I wanted to do a post exploring my own take on sex and gender differences, and the… Continue reading Separating Out Sex/Gender, Biology and Social Construct

Diagram of socially acceptable identities and deviant identities
Stop the Stigma

Racism, Prejudice, and Implicit/Explicit Beliefs

Last week I reviewed White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo. There were some important concepts that she alluded to but didn’t clearly explain, so I decided to do a post, from a social constructionist viewpoint, about how stereotypes and prejudice develop, and why the difference between implicit and explicit beliefs is important. Our societies create categories… Continue reading Racism, Prejudice, and Implicit/Explicit Beliefs

The COVID world is built for introverts - cartoon of a germ with a stay at home mask
Society & Social Justice

The COVID World Is Built for Introverts

I recently saw a post by The Opinionated Woman titled The World Is Built for Extroverts. My comment was that the COVID world is build for introverts, and I thought I'd elaborate on that a bit. To start off, let's consider what introverts and extroverts are. Introversion and extroversion lie on a spectrum, with most… Continue reading The COVID World Is Built for Introverts

Why are only some differences socially relevant? - cartoon faces
Society & Social Justice

Why Are Only Some Differences Socially Relevant?

As human beings, each of us is more alike than we are different. In fact, we all share 99.9% of the same genes, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute. Despite all of this sameness, we pay a lot of attention to differences... but only some differences are socially relevant, and the rest we… Continue reading Why Are Only Some Differences Socially Relevant?

What Is... Series (Insights into Psychology)
Insights into Psychology

What Is… a Psychological Construct

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms. This week's term is psychological construct. In psychology, constructs are ways to describe patterns of behaviour or experiences so that they can be explored, investigated, and discussed. It's a way of putting a name to things that don't exist in a… Continue reading What Is… a Psychological Construct

What Is... Series (Insights into Psychology)
Insights into Psychology

What is… Deindividuation

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms.  This week's term is deindividuation. Every human is a unique individual with self-awareness. Deindividuation is a process by which people start to lose that self-awareness when part of a group. Oxford Reference defines deindividuation as: A psychological state characterized by loss… Continue reading What is… Deindividuation

What Is... Series (Insights into Psychology)
Insights into Psychology

What Is… Sex vs. Gender?

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychological terms. This week's terms are sex vs. gender. As we near the end of Pride Month, I've spruced up this older post about terminology related to sex vs. gender. When I initially published it early last year, it got a few really ignorant… Continue reading What Is… Sex vs. Gender?

What is... insights into psychology series
Insights into Psychology

What Is… Herd Behaviour (and the Great Toilet Paper Shortage)

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms.  This week's term is herd behaviour. Are we people or sheeple? Turns out we're actually a lot more sheeplish than we might like to think that we are, and herd behaviour is exhibited across a range of different contexts. Kameda and… Continue reading What Is… Herd Behaviour (and the Great Toilet Paper Shortage)

What is... insights into psychology series
Insights into Psychology

What Is… The Stanford Prison Experiment

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms.  This week we'll look at the Stanford prison experiment. The Stanford prison experiment was a social psychology study carried out at Stanford University in 1971.  Male student volunteers were randomly assigned to be either "prisoners" or "guards" in a mock prison… Continue reading What Is… The Stanford Prison Experiment

What Is... Series (Insights into Psychology)
Insights into Psychology

What Is… Pluralistic Ignorance

In this series, I dig a little deeper into the meaning of psychology-related terms.  This week's term is pluralistic ignorance. Pluralistic ignorance is a type of social group bias in which members of a social group privately disagree with a certain belief or behaviour, but they publicly go along with what they perceive to be… Continue reading What Is… Pluralistic Ignorance