Medication Use in Pregnancy

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The world likes to get judgy when it comes to medications, particularly those that are viewed as addictive or otherwise “bad” in some way.  The judgyness grows exponentially when it’s a pregnant woman taking medication.

Obviously it’s a problem if a medication has a negative effect on a developing fetus.  However, in the real world things are seldom that simple.  There may be a lot of nuances in determining what’s the best choice for an individual woman, and unfounded fears about medication use in pregnancy could end up interfering with that.

Opioid use in pregnancy

Opioids are one type of medication that definitely has a bad reputation.  Yet when it comes to an individual weighing of pros and cons, regular opioid use during pregnancy could be a very good decision.  While there are negative effects of opioid abuse during pregnancy, that’s primarily due to repeated withdrawal cycles.  If women are instead put on opioid substitution therapy, it results in better outcomes for them and their babies.

For women who are already on opioids for chronic pain management, remaining on them may end up being the best choice, as it avoids the risks associated with withdrawal and also with untreated pain.  Untreated chronic pain can have a number of negative effects on the in utero environment.

Will a baby born to a mother taking opioids go into withdrawal?  Probably.  This is referred to as neonatal abstinence syndrome, and there are protocols to manage it, including giving morphine short-term with a downward tapering of the dose, and maximizing skin to skin contact between mom and baby.  Would it be great to avoid this?  Sure, but only if the alternatives are better.  A baby going into withdrawal sounds horrible, but it’s unfair to weigh that against an imagined alternative of rainbows and unicorns.

Mental illness medications in pregnancy

When it comes to mental health, untreated or undertreated serious mental illness is not good for mom or baby.  That means that when weighing any medication option, the alternatives are not high-risk medication or no-risk alternative.  If the illness can be managed without medication, that’s great, but with more severe illness that may not be possible.

When it comes to antidepressants, generally the recommendation is that whatever is most effective for treating mom’s depression is the safest option.  SSRI and SNRI antidepressants may lead to a neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which is usually mild and short-lived, and can be improved by a low stimulation environment and increased skin-to-skin time.

Things get a little dicier when it comes to mood stabilizers.  Lithium is associated with an increase in the risk of a rare heart defect called Ebstein’s anomaly.  Carbamazepine is a higher risk to cause birth defects, and valproic acid is substantially higher.

If I were to get pregnant I would most likely choose to stay on lithium.  Even a woman whose bipolar disorder was poorly controlled with anything over than valproic acid may decide that the risk of stopping the medication was greater than the risk of staying on it.  It really comes down to the individual woman’s risk profile.

The take-home message

I’m not trying to advocate for indiscriminate medication use in pregnancy.  If there’s an effective alternative available, that’s ideal, no question.  If you can find a way to stay well without medication, the choice is crystal-clear.  What I’m trying to get at is that there are a lot of different factors that need to go into making an individual decision, and it’s unfair to criticize a woman’s decision without having a full understanding of all of those specific individual factors.

So if you are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, have these conversations with your health care providers.  Don’t let other people’s judgments get in the way of what’s right for you and your family.  Choose the option where the pros outweigh the cons in your individual situation, regardless of what that choice ends up being and what other people think about it.

 

Psych Meds Made Simple by Ashley L Peterson book cover

 

There’s more information on psychiatric medication use in pregnancy in my first book, Psych Meds Made Simple, which is available on the MH@H Store, as well as Amazon and other major retailers.

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22 thoughts on “Medication Use in Pregnancy

  1. Meg says:

    I’m glad you’d stay on lithium! I’ve put some thought into it, too, and I’d stay on Prozac and Abilify. I’d go down on Seroquel from 200 mg to 25 mg. (25 mg keeps me from ever becoming manic, and even though more Seroquel helps me sleep soundly, I’d try to quit prioritizing that.) I’d go off Ambien and just accept that I’d be keeping irregular sleeping hours for the duration. Bye bye healthy sleep schedule. And I’d try to take less or go all the way off of Provigil. It’s an alertness aid, and I wouldn’t need to prioritize alertness; but without it, I tend to disconnect from reality, because the drug has other (good beneficial psychiatric) properties than alertness. Some of that might be touch and go. Oh, and I’d absolutely not breastfeed, because I’d need to go back on everything ASAP. I have other reason for not wanting to breastfeed, and it bums me out–talking about judgyness of new moms–that so many people think that it’s immoral to not breastfeed. [Rolls eyes.] Yeah, I think there needs to be way less judgyness, and it needs to be decided on a case-by-case deal with each pregnancy.

  2. Paula Light says:

    I terminated when I became accidentally pregnant on a migraine med. It was Category C, I think, and interfered with blood pressure. But I already had 2 healthy children and a failing marriage. No regrets.

  3. kachaiweb says:

    I had this conversation with my docor and he explained that a for one a lot of women get pregnant while on medication.
    And that there are none long term studies to prove that my medication would be harmful or not.
    He made it clear that first it is important to feel good because pregnancy is a time with a lot of changes. As I understood the health aspect of me being in a ‘good place’ was more important than worrying about medication or not.

  4. Hilary Tan says:

    Pregnancy posts are triggering for me so I’m surprised I’m handling this OK. Being on meds is tricky. In the drug books a lot of meds are contraindicated during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding. The only medication I was on was a progesterone medication they gave in second trimester which was deemed safe. While in the hospital, they injected me with another medication in the abdomen and I still question the safety of that medication. I’m guessing it was tinzaparin but I’m not entirely sure. They also did ultrasounds every two weeks due to being “high risk.”

  5. The Moody Mom says:

    I was on an SSRI when I became pregnant. I dropped it immediately. I also quit smoking and alcohol. I had none of my tools! Big surprise when I ended up with post partum depression. My dr put me back on SSRI and I had to quit breastfeeding. Oh the shame! People thought I was pure evil for not breastfeeding. At least I could function and take care of my baby! See my post today on addiction ❤️

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