group protesting, with a no sign in foreground

NIMBYism and mental health housing

NIMBYism is a fascinating phenomenon.  NIMBYs, or people think that something is okay just as long as it's Not In My BackYard, cover discrimination with a thin veneer of civility and acceptability.  Among the many manifestations of this is with regards to social housing, including supported housing for people with mental illness. NIMBYs' arguments may … Continue reading NIMBYism and mental health housing

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elephant head, body in shadow

#BellLetsTalk – What if the elephant in the room could speak?

Today is Bell Let's Talk Day (#BellLetsTalk), an anti-stigma mental health awareness campaign sponsored by the Canadian telecom company Bell.  Similar to the UK organization Time to Change's Time To Talk Day coming up on February 7, the goal is to get people talking about mental health and mental illness. A couple of weeks ago … Continue reading #BellLetsTalk – What if the elephant in the room could speak?

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Why can’t you search Pinterest for “depression”?

I discovered this quite a while back, but it just popped into my mind again recently.  Pinterest won't let you search for the word "depression".  If you try, it gives no results, just this message: "If you're in emotional distress or thinking about suicide, help is available."  If you search for "depressed" or "major depression", though, … Continue reading Why can’t you search Pinterest for “depression”?

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Man weighed down by bigotry and discrimination

How do you respond to stigmatized language?

Crazy.  Psycho.  Schizo.  Nutbar.   Mad.  Retard.  Lunatic.  Loony tunes.   Insane.  F***ed in the head.  Bonkers.   Whack job.  Batshit crazy.  Certifiable. These are just a few examples, but when it comes to derogatory mental-health related terms, there are many of them and we hear them often.  Sometimes we even use them ourselves. A … Continue reading How do you respond to stigmatized language?

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police officer with handcuffs and gun on waistbelt

Should people in mental health crisis be handcuffed?

When I showed up for my shift the other night at the concurrent disorders (mental health and addictions) transitional program where I work, I was told that one of the patients was being sent to hospital because she was having intense, active suicidal ideation.  Shortly after I arrived, paramedics and police showed up, and that's … Continue reading Should people in mental health crisis be handcuffed?

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