Book reviews, Mental Health

Book Review: Anecdotes on Volunteering

red rose sitting atop a book

Anecdotes on Volunteering is a short book written by Mio Angelo of Mentally Ill in America that looks at how schizoaffective disorder has interfered with his desire to volunteer or work.  The anecdotes are in relation to volunteering rather than stories of volunteer experience.

At one point, Mio describes the book as one big therapy session, and it’s more of a curious exploration and questioning rather than a matter of finding certainty.  He writes about living with a chronic psychotic illness, how it affects him, what it tells him, and what it means for him.

There’s no sugar-coating to be had here.  He writes:

“Question: Knowing that I have an illness—schizoaffective disorder (depressive type)— what exactly does having schizoaffective disorder (depressive type) mean? And, for me personally?

Answer: Even with a background in Psychology (I have a BA)—I feel as though I am fucked!”

He describes the four ingredients that have allowed him to do the best he can, including the role of spirituality and his belief system.

The book also delves into questions around individual importance and whether or not life is air.

Anecdotes on Volunteering blends philosophy with the reality of schizoaffective disorder life, and offers an interesting glimpse into Mio’s inner workings.  It’s well worth a read.

 

For a free copy of the book, email Mio at chilloutmusicproducer (at) gmail (dot) com.

Visit him on his blog Mentally Ill in America.

 

You can find my other book reviews here.

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